Salisbury Agreement

Evidence presented to this joint committee by some Liberal Democrats established that the original agreement “existed only between the Conservative and Labour parties, because and assuming that the Conservatives were the dominant force in the House of Lords. Neither the Liberals nor the non-aligned peers participated. She went on to quote with assent the statement in How Parliament Works that “the Salisbury Convention is perhaps more a code of conduct for the Conservative Party when it is in the lords in opposition than a convention of the Assembly.” The University of Salisbury currently has the following articulation agreements: 2. We have concluded that the Salisbury Addison Convention “does not apply strictly to measures provided for in a coalition agreement. This is because a coalition agreement does not have the same electoral mandate as a manifesto. 2 However, if all parties to a coalition have made the same or substantially similar commitment in their manifestos, they should be entitled to the Salisbury Addison Convention with respect to that commitment. 3 We also acknowledged that “a practice has developed, that the upper house does not normally block any government law, whether or not it is contained in a manifesto. There is no reason why this practice should not apply if there is a coalition government. 4 More recently, the House of Lords` Constitutional Committee has twice examined the Convention. In 2014, its report on the constitutional implications of a coalition government looked at the implementation of the Convention in a coalition government and concluded that the Convention “does not apply strictly to measures taken in a coalition agreement”. In 2017, the commission published another report specifically on the Convention, which focuses on its application to a minority government. This time, the report was just a vehicle for the publication of contributions on the subject by party leaders in the upper house, the Convenor of the Crossbench Peers and Professor Meg Russell, director of the Constitution Unit. 3. The 2017 parliamentary elections led to a minority Conservative government backed by a confidence and supply agreement with the Democratic Unionist Party.

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