Eu Mexico Trade Agreement Rules Of Origin

The agreement will make it easier for European and Mexican companies to invest in other`s markets, allowing more Mexican companies to invest in Europe or create production in the EU. The Interim Agreement, which was to enter into force until the entry into force of the Comprehensive Agreement, was approved by the Mexican Senate on 23 April 1998. The part of this agreement was approved by the European Parliament on 13 May 1998 and the parties exchanged instruments of ratification on 30 June 1998, which allowed the entry into force of the Interim Agreement on trade and trade-related matters on 1 July 1998. The agreement prohibits both parties from excessively promoting trade and investment: the chapter on the protection of intellectual property rights (Chapters VI, Article 69 and Annex XXI) includes, inter alia, patents, trademarks and copyrights and geographical indications. The level of protection in some areas goes beyond what is provided for in the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property, taking into account most-favoured-nation principles and domestic treatment. The Agreement contains provisions on geographical indications. The trade agreement is part of the new EU-Mexico Comprehensive Agreement, which will strengthen cooperation and regular high-level meetings between Mexico and the EU in the areas of human rights, security and justice. On 23 May 2016, the Council of the European Union approved the “negotiating directives”, often referred to as the “mandate”, to replace the 2000 EU-Mexico Comprehensive Agreement with an updated agreement. Another important point of the new agreement is that it aims to prevent and combat corruption. The agreement will bring improvements in more than 25 areas where trade barriers hamper the work of European exporters and importers. Both the EU and Mexico have agreed that the trade agreement between them should support existing environmental legislation and not reduce or dilute it.

The agreement prohibits both sides from pursuing “a race to the bottom.” They must therefore not excessively encourage trade and investment: the Economic Partnership, Political Coordination and Cooperation Agreement (the Global Agreement), which defines the objectives and mechanisms for liberalising trade in goods and services, was approved by the Mexican Senate on 20 March 2000 and on 6 May 1999 by the European Parliament. The part of the Free Trade Agreement, established by Decision 2/2000 of the EU-Mexico Joint Council, entered into force on 1 July 2000. . . .